Who’s the Master? Sho’nuff. We’ve got six more.

In what is widely accepted throughout Braden as perhaps our best degree ever, and even gaining critical acclaim from a visiting brother from the Great White North, Braden 168 has raised six new Master Masons in our Spring 2014 degree class.

What made this degree such a thing to behold is not just the excellent work the brothers put into it, but that the entire lodge breathed family.

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Three generations of masons

 

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Critical Failure: How Does a Lodge Decline to the Point of No Return

CriticalFailure_image_400x260px_Size4Someone raised an interesting question today. He asked if there was a particular number of members a lodge had to drop to, at which point the lodge starts a tailspin to failure, with almost no hope of return. That’s a tough question, and I don’t know if there’s so tidy of an answer to it. It’s no secret that membership in fraternal organizations began a steep decline in the Boomer generation. There were a lot of contributing socio-economic factors, but as the world spins on, things change and now these groups are rebuilding. I fully expect, however, that the destiny of healthy lodges will be smaller and more flexible, and many lodges, even those who have clawed their way through the 80s and 90s, are going to go away…

This post can be read in its entirety at its author’s Masonic blog, Stones n Bones. Click to read!

Why you shouldn’t become a Freemason.

Freemasonry  is shrouded in a pop-culture mystique of danger and intrigue. Now I won’t comment on if any of those intrigues are true (hint), but one thing is for sure,  Freemasonry has gotten a reputation as an organization in decline. This is very much not true.

Freemasonry is growing almost everywhere in exciting ways. Lodges are bringing in young, vibrant members, eager to learn traditions and add their own modern perspective. What is true, however, is that Freemasonry, along with every other fraternal club, saw huge booms in the twentieth century, and those boom times are gone. Frankly, those boom times were probably not that great for Freemasonry. They drew the focus away from self-improvement and brotherhood, and into more publicly-focused areas. Rather than helping each other grow better, many used their brotherhood to help each other grow richer. Charity became an industry, rather than a personal offer of relief, and to the receiver an acceptance of responsibility.

When membership declined from these lofty heights, some Masonic lodges moved toward an any-and-all-comers view of membership. But Freemasonry is not for everyone. Sadly, it’s not even for most people. And joining a Masonic lodge when you shouldn’t isn’t good for you, or your lodge. Here’s why you shouldn’t join Freemasonry.

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